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The Third Branch

Justice on Wheels rolls into Sheboygan

The Wisconsin Supreme Court celebrated the 20th anniversary of its Justice on Wheels program in October by hearing oral argument in the historic Sheboygan County Courthouse. The Court travels once each term as an outreach effort to bring oral argument to communities across Wisconsin.

The Court conducted hearings in two cases that questioned the constitutionality of police use of cell phone signals to track crime suspects. An estimated 300 people turned out to watch the oral arguments, including 75 students from the Lakeshore Technical College Police Academy.

The Court's first Justice on Wheels visit was to Green Bay in 1993. Since then, the justices have embraced the opportunity to bring their work to people across the state. The Court has also sat (in chronological order) in: Eau Claire, Marathon, Milwaukee, La Crosse, Douglas, Rock, Kenosha, Sauk, Dodge, Oneida, Outagamie, Portage, Racine, Fond du Lac, Walworth, Waushara, St. Croix, Winnebago, Iowa, Washington, Columbia, and Green counties.

Chief Justice Shirley S. Abrahamson greets a crowd of local leaders in Sheboygan County at an opening ceremony marking the Supreme Court's historic first sitting in Sheboygan.
Chief Justice Shirley S. Abrahamson greets a crowd of local leaders in Sheboygan County at an opening ceremony marking the Supreme Court's historic first sitting in Sheboygan.
Chief Justice Shirley S. Abrahamson presents plaques to fifth graders Allison Kerr and T.J. Edson, both from Wilson Elementary School, who tied for third place in the Supreme Court Essay Contest. Elliot Opel of Pigeon River School won first place, and  Austin J. Lammers of Oostburg Christian School won second place in the contest. Justices Annette Kingsland Ziegler (center) and Ann Walsh Bradley (right) joined the rest of the Court in celebrating the students’ hard work. The Court runs the contest as part of its Justice on Wheels outreach program, and this year Justice David T. Prosser served as judge. Sheboygan Atty. Casey Hoff introduces State v. Bobby Tate, a case involving the use of cell phone signals to track a suspect.  When the Supreme Court travels, local attorneys are tapped to study the briefs in each case and make presentations to the hundreds of spectators who assemble to watch oral arguments.

Chief Justice Shirley S. Abrahamson presents plaques to fifth graders Allison Kerr and T.J. Edson, both from Wilson Elementary School, who tied for third place in the Supreme Court Essay Contest. Elliot Opel of Pigeon River School won first place, and Austin J. Lammers of Oostburg Christian School won second place in the contest. Justices Annette Kingsland Ziegler (center) and Ann Walsh Bradley (right) joined the rest of the Court in celebrating the students' hard work. The Court runs the contest as part of its Justice on Wheels outreach program, and this year Justice David T. Prosser served as judge.

Sheboygan Atty. Casey Hoff introduces State v. Bobby Tate, a case involving the use of cell phone signals to track a suspect. When the Supreme Court travels, local attorneys are tapped to study the briefs in each case and make presentations to the hundreds of spectators who assemble to watch oral arguments.

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